About

Learn a little about me – the short and sweet bio

Contemporary literature too often scandalizes people, polluting their minds by promoting ill-will and disbelief, glorifying questionable morals and making heroes out of villains. To entertain people while also edifying them Keith Mayhew-Hammond feels that there is a need for more stories that promote faith, morality, charity and goodwill. In that spirit he has found a fulfilling call in writing such works.

Since early childhood, struggling with the symptoms of Obsessive-Compulsive-Disorder (OCD), Asperger’s, Acute Anxiety and Depression intensified for Keith his crippling religious doubts and worries regarding time and death. The experience of attempting to control these through his faith, as well as struggles with bullying, gave him insight and inspiration for writing his first novel, St Nick’s Journey: Suffering Souls of Awahso, in which such themes are prominent.

In his early youth Keith sought God by the practice of Evangelical Protestantism. After a long journey of looking at different Christian sects he eventually found the fullness of faith in the Holy Catholic Church founded by Christ and is now a member of the Ordinariate of the Chair of St Peter and lector and altar server at Good Shepherd Church.

Educated at Dr. F.J. Donevan Collegiate Institute he served briefly in the Canadian Reserve with the Ontario Regiment. He was born and lives in Oshawa, Ontario, Canada.

A little more about me

– the ridiculously long and much more tedious bio
(Seriously, you just won’t believe how long it is)

Keith Mayhew-Hammond is a proud member of the Deanery of St. John the Baptist (www.stjohnthebaptistdeanery.com) in Canada, and of the Personal Ordinariate of the Chair of St. Peter (a Catholic ordinariate of Anglican Patrimony [ordinariate.net]) in North America; and is a lector and altar server at Good Shepherd Church. He is also a spirited member and cofounder of the Fraternal Society of Our Lady of Walsingham.

He enjoys constructive conversations about theology, philosophy, the natural sciences; and reading and listening to audiobooks. Keith is more fond of small gatherings than big ones. He likes to play billiards, cards, games, dining, coffee & tea, and long car rides and road trips – at least if he’s not driving.

Fashion & History

Keith has a special interest in medieval, baroque, and Victorian history; especially gothic architecture and the British Empire. He also has a strange fascination with neckwear and collar styles – though it goes without saying that he favours the regular necktie. Who doesn’t long for the day when popped shirt collars with neckwear will become common once more? Or is that just him?

Music

Keith loves choral music, both on its own and accompanied. He particularly adores baroque music; especially motets. He loves all styles of Christian chanting; such as Coptic, Russian, Greek, and Armenian. But he holds a special place in his soul for high Anglican & Gregorian chant. And of course, last but not least, timeless Christmas carols and hymns have been much loved by Keith since childhood. Although it might be worth noting that this does not include the, arguably annoying, Christmas tunes constantly played on the radio.

Desires

For future interests, Keith would like to one day learn European fencing. Perhaps when the pandemic is finally over.

Devotionals & Sacramentals

Some of Keith’s favourite devotionals include: the holy sacrifice of the mass, rosary, divine mercy chaplet, St. Michael chaplet, the seven sorrows & joys of St. Joseph, the seven sorrows of Mary, 100 requiem prayers, stations of the cross, child Jesus chaplet, holy face chaplet, and the psalms.

Keith’s favourite sacramentals include the St. Benedict medal; brown, five-fold, green, and St. Joseph scapulars; the holy face, miraculous, and saint medals; blessed candles & chalk; blessed salt & holy water; and holy pictures and statues.

Favoured Friends of Heaven

A few of Keith’s favourite titles of Christ are the Divine Child of the Cross; Infant of Prague; Christ the King; Hidden Jesus; Eucharist; Divine Mercy; and our dear brother and friend.

A selection of Keith’s favourite titles for Mary include the Star of the Sea; Our Lady of the Snows; Our Lady Help of Christians; Our Lady of Perpetual Help; Our Lady Undoer of Knots; Our Lady of Prayer; Our Lady of Walsingham; Our Lady of Knock; Our Lady of the Cape; Our Lady of the Cave of Revelation; Our Lady of Good Success; Our Lady of Ransom; Our Lady of Life; Our Lady of LaSallete; Our Lady of Lourdes; Our Lady of Fatima; Our Lady of the Rosary; Our Lady Health of the Sick; Our Lady of Mount Carmel; Our Lady of Sorrows; Mother of Divine Mercy; Our Lady of China; and Our Lady of Good Health. Believe it or not there’s more.

And let’s not leave out a few of Keith’s favourite titles for St. Joseph, which are St. Joseph Hope of the Sick; Terror of Demons; Guardian of the Holy Family; Patron of Spiritual Communions; Patron of the Dying; Mirror of Patience; Patron of Canada; Pillar of Families; Solace of the Wretched; Lover of Poverty; Glory of Home Life; Model of Artisans; & Protector of Holy Church.

Keith’s patron saint is St. Dominic Savio. And although he cannot list all of his favourite hallows, here is a fond selection of some patrons that he holds dear: St. John Bosco, Louis Comollo; St. Francisco & Jacinta Marto & Sister Lucille; St. Stanislaus Kostka; St. Aloysius Gonzaga; St. Gabriel Possenti of Our Lady of Sorrows; Blessed Carlo Acutis; St. Tarcisius; Servant of God Manuel Fodera; Venerable Silvio Dissegna; Servant of God Didacus of Sinagra; St. Nick; St. Robert Southwell; Venerable Matt Talbot; Venerable Fulton Sheen; Blessed Karl of Austria; St. Brendan; St. Wenceslaus & Podiven; St. John Paul II; St. Mary Magdelaine; St. Abel; St. Seth; St. Isaac, Jacob, & Joseph; the Three Saintly Youth; the Three Wise Men; St. Augustine; St. Anne & Joachim; St. Roch; St. Jude; St. Anthony; St. Christopher; St. Jose Sanchez del Rio; King Charles the Martyr; Guardian Angels; St. Michael, St. Raphael, & St. Gabriel; archangels & the nine choirs of angels.

The Church Suffering

And last but not least, Keith shares a special place in his heart for the poor holy souls in purgatory. The voiceless are the easiest to forget about. But just as it is important to pray for the living, it is important to never neglect the dead. Those who die in God’s friendship don’t stop being our companions. The suffering souls who await heaven are more than grateful for any kind prayer or act of kindness offered for them. And rest assured, they will remember you and your charity as they constantly recommend you before God. Love/charity covers a multitude of sins.

Conclusion

If you are somehow still here, congratulations for reading through all those words. Longsuffering patience is a virtue. Perhaps it would be appropriate to finish off this about page here before it turns into a novel with no plot points.

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